Academics

Course Clusters

The Course Cluster Program builds on the pedagogical approach and multidisciplinary perspective of the College Core Curriculum. It is designed to expose students to ideas from the vantage point of different disciplines across the humanities, social, physical, and biological sciences; to stimulate and cultivate the student’s intellectual curiosity and sense of academic adventure; to help students structure their electives without imposing programmatic strictures and limiting the freedom of intellectual exploration. The only prerequisite of Cluster courses is that they have no prerequisites and are not designed primarily for minors/majors (even though they can count towards major requirements).

For more information on each of these courses, visit the College Catalog

2018-2019 Course Clusters

Chicago can be explored from nearly any academic perspective or discipline. Through courses that explore aspects of Chicago's ecology, culture, politics, history, social structure, and economic life, students deepen their knowledge of frameworks and approaches relevant to the study of Chicago and other cities. 

Students interested in a more immersive, interdisciplinary experience of the city should consider applying to the Chicago Studies Quarter, offered annually in the Spring.

Autumn 2018

Winter 2019

Spring 2019

Students explore climate change through the varying lenses of historians, political scientists, literary scholars, and philosophers. Courses in the Social Sciences and Humanities Collegiate Divisions complement courses in the Physical and Biological Sciences Collegiate Divisions to contextualize this complex modern problem.

Autumn 2018

Winter 2019

Spring 2019

Journeying through the highs and lows of economic achievement that shaped our current society, students gain the tools to better understand economic history from a wide range of cultures over a broad span of time.

Winter 2019

Spring 2019

Law and legal systems have played a major role in functioning societies for centuries. Students analyze written evidence to discover how societies from Greece, Rome, Babylonia, Assyria, Israel, Egypt, China, and India instituted and navigated laws.

Winter 2019

Students trace the sources of inequality and mobility, selecting from courses in Economics, History, Political Science, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Public Policy, and other disciplines.

Winter 2019

  • TBD

Spring 2019

  • TBD

Through courses in Art History, Geographical Studies, History, Anthropology, Sociology, Comparative Human Development, and other disciplines, students understand the purpose of urban design and learn the reasons behind notable successes and failures.

Autumn 2018

Winter 2019

  • TBD

Spring 2019

  • TBD